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FAQ

How Should A Pull-On Boot Fit? When you are holding the boot to try-on grasp the boot pulls at the sides. Your foot may struggle a bit to “pop” down into the boot. This is known as “breaking the throat” of a handmade boot. * HINT: Wearing a plastic bag over your foot during this process may be helpful. Getting past the throat of the boot is the first step. Don’t worry, your foot will come back out and this only has to be done the first time. Please don’t pull a muscle trying to get this first step accomplished. You will know if it’s just not going to work. Having a high instep or any previous foot injuries may make this task more difficult or even impossible. The boot should fit securely to the foot. Boots should not fit loosely or tightly, but the fit should be snug. The Roper has a more forgiving fit, but the same principles still hold true.

• Instep: Unlike shoes with laces, a boot has only the instep to hold it securely to the foot. Consequently, proper fit in the instep is of utmost importance. Boots should not fit loosely or tightly; the fit should be snug. The snugness is governed by the instep fit and the width of the throat. If the instep is too tight, go to a wider or larger size.

• Ball: When you walk or run, you bend your foot at its widest part, which is called the ball. In a quality boot, you will find a steel shank between the insole and the outsole that extends from the heel to the point where the ball of the boot begins. If the boot is too short for the foot, the ball of the foot will sit too far forward and force the toes into the toe box.

• Heel: A boot must slip slightly in the heel. There is nothing to prevent the heel of the foot from riding up slightly because of the way a boot is constructed. When the boot is new, the sole is stiff. As you wear the boot, the sole is "flexed." With time, most of the slippage will disappear. If the instep is too loose, the boot will slip excessively in the heel. To remedy this, you may need a more narrow width to shorten the circumference of the throat and thus lessen the slipp